Walking tour, stop 17

Hallenbrink | Stadtkirche church | Schools

Dieser Stadtrundgang ist optimiert für Smartphone und Tablet.

Vor Ort in der Bad Salzufler Innenstadt finden Sie bei jeder Station einen Pflasterstein mit QR-Code. Diesen einfach scannen und Sie bekommen die Infos zum jeweiligen Standort angezeigt und können sich von Ihrem mobilen Gerät zu den weiteren Stationen navigieren lassen.

Hallenbrink | Stadtkirche church | Schools

The Stadtkirche on Hallenbrink

The Stadtkirche on Hallenbrink

The Stadtkirche church tower on Hallenbrink can be seen high up above the houses in Salzuflen’s old town for miles around. This place of worship is a church without aisles and with angled corners to the east. It was largely destroyed during the town fire of 5 November 1762 and rebuilt between 1763 and 1765 using the remaining late Gothic structure. The lower part of the massive tower was part of the previous building, and the late Gothic portal is dated 1524. The tower is crowned by a cupola, which was completed in 1782.

The church tower is a total of 52 metres high. On the left-hand side of the tower, by the staircase that leads to the belfry, is a stone with the following Latin inscription chiselled into it: An[n]o DM MCCCC (meaning: the year of our Lord 1400). It is the oldest remaining record of this church’s history. A number of dated stones set into the north-east buttress provide evidence of alterations and extensions to the church in 1476, 1577, 1709, 1892 and 1962. Today, Bad Salzuflen’s Protestant Reformed community worships at the Stadtkirche on Hallenbrink.

A note on the historic background: Salzuflen only became an independent parish during the Reformation in 1531, when Luther’s teaching was adopted. Before this, despite being granted a town charter in 1488, Salzuflen had belonged to the ancient parish of Schötmar – which was probably established in the 9th century – since 1231. Salzuflen’s parish church was therefore Kilianskirche (St Kilian’s church) in the neighbouring town. It is believed that a chapel was built on Hallenbrink in the early 14th century, on the site of the current Stadtkirche, which was gradually extended and became a daughter church of Schötmar. In the early 17th century, the people of Salzuflen changed their denomination from Protestant Lutheran to Protestant Reformed. New Lutheran and Catholic communities were only established in the second half of the 19th century.

The former school building

The former school building

The history of schooling in Salzuflen also began up on Hallenbrink. The town’s first school was built here, on the edge of the churchyard, in 1531. Following its destruction during the town fire in 1762, a new school was built. This magnificent half-timbered house with eaves running parallel to the street front and a half-hipped roof remains a defining part of Hallenbrink to this day. It once housed three schools run by church officials: one by the priest, another by the precentor and a third by the sexton.

Directly opposite it is the ‘red school’ – a no less impressive brick structure (built in 1879 for the then priest’s school). Both school buildings have been used for residential purposes for some time now. The collection of historic school buildings on the fringes of the old town is completed by the ‘yellow school’ dating from 1907/08 (Martin-Luther-Strasse 2). This former elementary school now serves three different purposes: it is used by a local primary school, houses the town archive and serves as a community centre where various groups hold their meetings.