Walking tour, stop 8

The half-timbered house at Lange Strasse 41

Dieser Stadtrundgang ist optimiert für Smartphone und Tablet.

Vor Ort in der Bad Salzufler Innenstadt finden Sie bei jeder Station einen Pflasterstein mit QR-Code. Diesen einfach scannen und Sie bekommen die Infos zum jeweiligen Standort angezeigt und können sich von Ihrem mobilen Gerät zu den weiteren Stationen navigieren lassen.

The half-timbered house at Lange Strasse 41

The half-timbered house at Lange Strasse 41

The half-timbered house at Lange Strasse 41


With its three-storey gable that juts out in four tiers and its rich decorative rosettes, this house was built in 1618 in the Renaissance style. Originally constructed for a wealthy townsman who farmed a smallholding, it is now one of the most-photographed buildings in the whole region. The house was extended out to the back in the 18th century. It has changed hands countless times and been used for many different purposes over its history spanning almost 400 years. It housed the town museum until 2010.

Previous proprietors included the Obermeyer family of Jewish entrepreneurs, who started running a shop selling household goods and ironmongery here in 1900. When the National Socialists came to power in 1933, the Jewish population began to be systematically ostracised and disenfranchised throughout Germany, including in Bad Salzuflen. Nazi thugs destroyed the building’s windows and commercial space during the overnight pogrom from 9 to 10 November 1938. Siegfried Obermeyer was forced to shut his shop for good at the end of 1938. In summer 1939, ownership of the house passed to the town of Bad Salzuflen. Siegfried Obermeyer, his wife Amalia and their eldest son Ernst were murdered in the Lodz ghetto and Auschwitz concentration camp between 1942 and 1944.

The only member of the family to survive was the youngest son, Hans, who was able to flee to England as part of the Kindertransport mission in July 1939. He lived in the USA until his death in 2015.